Isaac Yike, Company B

Posted in 40th Haversack, Soldier Profile with tags , , on March 3, 2016 by 40thindiana

yike isaac

Early wartime image of Private Isaac Yike (b.1838). Isaac was an original member of Company B, enlisting at Chili, Miami County, Indiana. He was with the 40th Indiana during all of it’s hard fought battles. During 1864, Yike would reenlist as a Veteran Volunteer. By war’s end Isaac had attained the rank of sergeant. After the war he returned home to Miami County, where he would live until his death on August 21, 1907. This early image shows Private Yike wearing a frock coat, forage cap and grasping his 1853 Enfield rifle-musket.

Death of Lt. Col. James N. Kirkpatrick

Posted in 40th Haversack, Regimental History with tags , on November 2, 2015 by 40thindiana

An article from the Lafayette Daily Courier, June 12, 1862.

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Lt. Col. Kirkpatrick’s grave, Wildcat Cemetery, Lafayette, IN.

Col. Kirkpatrick’s Death

D.M. Osburn, of Co. A, 40th regiment sends us a detailed statement of the melancholy circumstances attending the death of Lieut. Col. Kirkpatrick:

“Yesterday morning (June 8, 1862) our regiment took two days’ rations and marched for Bear Creek to help build a railroad bridge where one had been destroyed by the 10th Indiana Regiment in the effort to bag the rebels. After we arrived at the place we were marched above the road into the shade and stacked arms. The Colonel and two other men got into a canoe and started across the stream, and when about two-thirds over, the front end dipped water and the canoe sank. All were good swimmers, and when within about fifteen feet of shore it appears that Col. Kirkpatrick took a cramp, and Col. Blake, seeing that he was sinking, cried out for some men who were in another canoe to hasten to his relief, but none got there until to late. Several of our boys swam across and dove after him, but the water was too deep to find him. He was under water about fifteen minutes, when he was brought up with a hook, but all efforts to resuscitate him were fruitless.”

Captain John Pence, Company E

Posted in Shiloh, Soldier Profile with tags , , , , on June 11, 2015 by 40thindiana

History of Montgomery County, Indiana. Indianapolis: AW Bowen, 1913

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Grave of Capt. Pence, Oak Hill Cemetery, Crawfordsville Indiana

Capt. John B. Pence, superintendent gas company, Crawfordsville, was born in Frankfort, Clinton county, Indiana, August 29, 1833. His father was a farmer, and he worked on the farm in the summer to make money to pay his way in school during the winter. He attended Hanover College two terms, and Asbury University about one year. At the age of twenty-one he began clerking in the dry-goods store of P. S. Kelley, in Frankfort. He continued with him about one year and a half and then went into the dry-goods business for himself, and thus continued till the outbreak of the war. In the fall of 1861 he recruited Co. E, for the 40th Ind. reg., of which company he was made captain. He remained in the army about one year, and then resigned on account of ill-health. The principal engagement that he was in was the siege of Corinth. After the war he began in the drug business in Frankfort and continued until 1874, when he settled in Crawfordsville, and has ever since been superintendent of the gas company. Mr. Pence has traveled considerably in the different parts of the United States. In politics he is an ardent republican. He was married September 16, 1856, to Miss Sallie E. Kelley, daughter of P. S. Kelley, his old employer. Mr. and Mrs. Pence are both members of the Center Presbyterian church of this city.

Sergeant John W. Jennings, Company H.

Posted in Atlanta Campaign, Soldier Profile with tags , , , on June 6, 2015 by 40thindiana

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Grave of Sgt. John W. Jennings, Liberty Chapel, Cairo, Tippecanoe County.

John W. Jennings one of the representative citizens of Tippecanoe County, is a native of this county, born in Tippecanoe Township, January 7, 1845, his father, Abel B. Jennings, being on of the old pioneers of the county.  Abel B. Jennings was a native of Ohio, his wife, Minerva (Graves) Jennings, also being a native of the Buckeye State.  They reared a family of nine children: F.M., living in Sioux City, Iowa; Sarah, living at Brookston, Indiana; MARTHA, at LaFayette; L.B. of Polk City, Iowa; L.N., P.L. and John W. are residents of Tippecanoe Township, and two, named Jacob and Mary E., deceased.  Able Jennings lived in Tippecanoe Township until his death, which occurred March 1884.  The mother of our subject is still living, aged sixty-six yeras.  The father being a farmer by occupation, John W., our subject, was reared to the same avocation.  He was a soldier in the war of the Rebellion, enlisting December 1, 1861, in Company H, Fortieth Indiana Infantry, and served in the Army of the Cumberland.  He participated in the hard fought battles of Shiloh, Mission Ridge, Buzzard’s Roost, Resaca, New Hope Church and Kenesaw Mountain.  June 27, 1864, at the battle of Kenesaw Mountain he received a severe gunshot wound in the left side of his face, which carried away his upper jaw and a part of his tongue.  He was then confined in different hospitals until November 20, 1864, when he was honorably discharged on account of disability resulting from his wound from the effects of which he has never recovered.  He then returned to Tippecanoe County, and was united in marriage April 6, 1866, to Miss Hester A. Shigley, a daughter of Adam P. and Rachel (O’Shal) Shigley, of Tippecanoe Township.  They are the parents of eight children named as follows: Alice, Lizzie, Belle, George, James, Asa, Dora and Arthur.  For three years after his marriage Mr. Jennings resided at LaFayette.  He settled on the farm where he now resides on section 9, Tippecanoe Township, in 1887, where he has fifty acres of well-improved land, a comfortable and commodious residence and good farm buildings.  In politics Mr. Jennings affiliates with the Republican party. He is a comrade of the John A. Logan Post, G.A.R., of LaFayette, and also belongs to the Odd Fellows lodge at Brookston, Indiana, No. 164.  He is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church.

Biographical Record and Portrait Album of Tippecanoe County Indiana. pp 381-382

Pvt. William H. Earhart

Posted in Franklin with tags , , , , on May 28, 2015 by 40thindiana

william h_ earhart

William H. Earhart enlisted into the 40th Indiana Regiment on October 25, 1864 at Wabash, Tippecanoe County, Indiana The new member of Company C was born on August 31, 1845, Venango, County, Pennsylvania. There were many recruits and draftees being gathered during this time period as veteran regiments were trying to fill their depleted ranks after suffering heavy losses of killed and wounded during the Atlanta Campaign. In the “History of the 57th Indiana Vols.,”  it  is recorded that there were large amounts of new recruits arriving in November, 1864. The new men, including Pvt. Earhart, were not going to have much ‘break in time.’ William would be thrown into his first action around Spring Hill, Tennessee, as the  army was racing to Nashville ahead of a perusing  Army of Tennessee.

After escaping Spring Hill, the Federal Army stopped at Franklin, Tennessee and started building breastworks in order to slow the Confederate pursuit. General Wagner’s men were place forward of the main works acting as skirmishers, there was little cover in this location. On November 30, 1864, massive lines of Confederate infantry unfolded before the eyes of Wagner’s men. To this day it is not fully understood why Wagner, a man with a solid battlefield reputation, did not bring his men into the main works. This would be the downfall of Wagner. Never the less, one can only wonder what was going through the mind of William Earhart and the rest of the recruits. As the Confederates approached, Wager’s men tried to make a stand and were soon overwhelmed by a Confederate attack larger than Pickett’s Charge at Gettysburg. The veteran troops as well as the new recruits soon broke and ran for the main line of their works, with Confederates in close pursuit. There were many men killed and captured during the flight, the stragglers also had to avoid friendly fire as regiments in the works started firing, trying to stem the gray tide that was coming. William did make it into the works, and would be fighting in the works well into the night. After the fighting ended, there was no time for rest , the army was immediately on the march seeking security in Nashville.

After making it safely to Nashville, William would have some time to reflect on the nightmare he had just lived through. On December 15-16, 1864, the Federal Army under General George H. Thomas, would leave their works and attack the remnants of the Confederate Army encircled  around Nashville. The battle of Nashville would be William’s third major combat during his first two months of service. After defeating General John B. Hood’s Confederate at Nashville, the Union Army pursued the routed Confederates into Alabama. The major fighting was over in this theater of the war, but not William’s service. He would go into Texas with the regiment, because there was still work to be done. William Earhart  Mustered out of the 40th Indiana on October 24, 1865. He had seen a lot during one year of service and probably felt lucky to be alive. He returned to his life in Indiana after the war.  Private William H. Earhart died on October 6, 1937, Markle, Huntington, County, Indiana.

Scott Busenbark

Walter Morris, Company A

Posted in Atlanta Campaign, Missionary Ridge with tags , on May 28, 2015 by 40thindiana

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Walter Morris Grave, Spring Valley Cemetery, Tippecanoe County, IN

OBITUARY: Sudden Death of Walter Morris: Walter Morris, a carpenter residing on Twenty-sixth street, died very suddenly on the street near his house about 2 o’clock Tuesday afternoon, and death is believed to have resulted from disease of the heart. Mr. Morris was well advanced in years, and came to this city about two years ago. He was employed in the construction of a number of residences in the Belt addition or Hulls mill area, and was an industrious and prudent gentleman. He was a church member and a sincere Christian. His life was a useful one and he was highly esteemed by all who knew him. The suddenness of his death was a severe shock to the family and its members have the sympathy of all in their sorrow. Funeral took place at 9th St. Church with odd fellows being in charge. Buried at Springvale Cemetery/ lot 36-section 29. — Walter fought in the War of the Rebellion. Enrolled at Stockwell, IN on Sept. 7, 1861. Muster in Oct 31, 1861 with his brother William at the Culvers Station-Stockwell, IN. Age 24, eyes grey, Hair Brown, Height 5′ 6′, Complexion Light, Occupation, carpenter. A Pvt. in the 40th Infantry with Captain Kirpatrick. He was wounded in battle at Missionary Ridge, (and) in his right arm June 27, 1864 (Kennesaw Mt.) by mini balls, but survived his wounds and is discharged Dec. 4, 1864. — Walter came to Tippecanoe County with this family around 1860. Settling in Sheffield Township. His parents were John Morris and Caroline Horscroft-Morris of England. Children of John Morris and Caroline Horsecraft are: i. Elizabeth Morris, m. Thomas Avery, April 01, 1858, Tippecanoe Co. Indiana.

Segeant Scott Elliott, Comapny A

Posted in Atlanta Campaign, Soldier Profile, Wagners Brigade with tags , , , , , , on April 28, 2015 by 40thindiana
Sergeant Scott Elliott, Company A

Sergeant Scott Elliott, Company A

The community of Dayton located in Sheffield Township, Tippecanoe County, was no different than other communities across the state of Indiana. When the call for volunteers came in 1861, friends and family from these close knit communities would form companies for military service. For many, it was comforting to know that the men you were serving with were those you had known for a lifetime. I am sure Scott felt this way. Scott was the son of Robert and June Wallace Elliott, born in Sheffield Twp., 1839. Scott enlisted with his cousin Charles T. Elliott. Census records show Scott was engaged working on the family farm.

During December, 1861, Scott and Charles went to Stockwell, Indiana and officially mustered in. After gathering enough recruits to form a company, the men set off for Camp Tippecanoe, located outside of Lafayette, Indiana. On December 30, 1861, this company was officially placed into Company A, 40th Indiana Infantry Regiment. Elections were held for company officers, Scott’s cousin Charles T. Elliott was elected as 1st Lieutenant of Company A. The regiment would travel by rail to encamp at Camp Morton in Indianapolis, it then proceeded South to Bardstown, Kentucky were they would finish their military training.

During 1862, Scott and Charles would help take the City of Nashville without a fight. The 40th would see light action on April 7, 1862 at Shiloh. They would take an active part in the siege of Corinth, Mississippi, and would also be lightly engaged at the battle of Perryville, Kentucky.

On December 31, 1862 the 40th Indiana was engaged in the battle of Stones River. Wagner’s Brigade was positioned in the Cedars. The 40th Indiana was squeezed out of the brigade line of battle early on and was placed in a support position between the Nashville Pike and railroad. Being  posted on a slight rise the 40th was exposed to heavy artillery and small arms fire, several casualties occurred here. Around 3:00 p.m. the regiment was ordered to relieve the 58th Indiana on the front line. Minutes after arriving in their new position the 40th Indiana started taking Confederate artillery fire, as a Confederate brigade started approaching. The 4th Florida and part of the 60th North Carolina broke off and headed straight for the 40th Indiana Regiment. Major Leaming, commanding the 40th Indiana, let the Rebel regiments come within easy musket range and ordered the regiment to fire. After several musket volleys , the Confederates were in full retreat. At Stones River the 40th Indiana lost 4 men killed, 65 wounded and 12 missing. One of the wounded was Scott Elliott, records state that he was slightly wounded in the shoulder.

During the summer of 1863, Wagner’s Brigade was marching and skirmishing with Confederates that were slowly being pressed back towards Chattanooga. They marched along with Wilder’s Mounted Infantry Brigade and Eli Lilly’s Battery to the outskirts of Chattanooga. Scott would witness Lilly’s Battery throwing some shells into the city one Sunday morning. The Confederates soon evacuated Chattanooga and Wagner’s Brigade was left to garrison  the city. This is the reason why Wagner’s Brigade was not present during the battle of Chickamauga.

After the Union Army was defeated at Chickamauga, they would retreat into the fortress city of Chattanooga. On November 25, 1863 Scott and Charles would take an active part assaulting the dominating Confederate position on top of Missionary Ridge where the 40th Indiana lost 158 killed and wounded. It is a wonder that Scott and Charles survived the battle.

During spring, 1864, the 40th Indiana would take an active role in General Sherman’s Atlanta Campaign. The 40th Indiana was engaged at the battle of Resaca, GA. The men of the 40th Indiana would spend most of their days under continuous musket and artillery fire from the Confederate Army. By this time Scott was a sergeant and cousin Charles was Captain of company A.

By late June the Union Army was in front of Kennesaw Mountain, near Marietta, GA. General Sherman  had been flanking the Confederates out of every defensive position they  would make in North Georgia. This time Sherman had a different plan, a direct assault on a well entrenched Confederate Army.

June 27, 1864, Kennesaw Mountain. General Newton’s 4th Corps brigades were placed in close-packed columns of reqimental divisions, each presenting a two-company front and a depth of 30 lines.The 57th Indiana were sent forward as division skirmishers and the 40th Indiana occupied the front of the assaulting column. At 9 A.M. the signal was given to advance, the Hoosiers crossed the works, and drove the rebel skirmishers into their fortifications. The enemy reserved their artillery fire until the  40th Indiana had advanced to within a short distance of their works, they raised a yell, and were moving forward on the double-quick, when the Confederates opened a withering fire of grape and canister.  The 40th Indiana having caught up with the 57th Indiana skirmishers, began tugging and slashing at the abatis in order to clear a pathway. They were 40 yards from the Confederate works, the men began to panic, pushing and crowding each other. The 57th & 40th Indiana were targets in a shooting gallery. It was a horrific scene. Sometime during this assault Sergeant Scott Elliott was killed, along with his cousin Captain Charles T. Elliott. The 40th Indiana went into the fight with 300 men, it’s loss was 106 men killed and wounded.

Major Henry Leaming wrote a letter to the Lafayette Newspaper which said in part: “Captain  C. Elliott, there was no more gallant spirit, no more noble and generous gentleman, a more efficient officer in the whole Army of The Cumberland; his loss is most acutely felt.”   (Lafayette Courier, July 11, 1864)

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The bodies of Scott and Charles were recovered from the battlefield and shipped home for burial. They were “impressive funeral ceremonies” for the cousins. They are laid to rest side by side in the Dayton Cemetery, Dayton, Indiana.

Another family member of Scott Elliott participated in and survived the hellish assault. Pvt. J. Newton Fullenwider, Company H, was Scott’s brother-in-law. His wife was Mary A. Elliott. She was living near the town of Waveland, Indiana taking care of her children and a farm while Newt was serving in the 40th Indiana. When news of the battle and it’s losses reached her, one can only imagine her emotions. Happy her husband had survived, but utterly torn that she had lost a brother and a cousin. Sometimes we forget about the impact of the war on the home front.

elliott

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