Pvt. Jerome B. Dooley

Jerome B. Dooley 2

Pvt. Jerome B. Dooley (left); on Table Rock, Lookout Mountian 

Jerome Dooley

 Jerome B. Dooley

Jerome Bonaparte Dooley was born on February 4, 1844 in Waveland, Indiana. Apparently he was totally or mostly blind in his left eye as a result of a pre-war accident involving a whip. His first experience in the Army occurred when he enlisted for 60 days in Company D, of the 78th Indiana Inf. on August 1, 1862. Statements in his pension note that the regiment was raised to drive out guerrillas from the vicinity of Henderson, KY. During their brief service, the 78th Indiana was engaged at Uniontown on September 1. There he and much of the regiment was taken prisoner, sent home and was discharged on October 1.

Jerome’s military records indicate that he stood at 5’9, had light hair and blue eyes. His occupation was listed as a farmer. In late 1863, Sergeant J.W. O’Brien returned home to Waveland for the purpose of recruiting men into his company. On December 15, 1863 he volunteered as a Private in Company H, of the 40th Indiana. He was sworn into service at Lafayette two days later. In early July 1864 he contracted chronic diarrhea near Kennesaw Mountain, Georgia and was sent to a general field hospital near Atlanta later that month. He remained there for two or three days before being sent to another hospital near Vining Station, Georgia on the north side of the Chattahoochee River and kept for another 2 or 3 days. He was then sent to Chattanooga, Tennessee about August 1 and placed in a hospital tent near Ft. Wood. After being treated there for nearly a week he was moved to US Hospital No. 2 at Nashville about August 5. He was furloughed on October 2, 1864 and readmitted on November 12, 1864. Muster rolls and pension papers state that he was wounded at Franklin on November 30, 1864. The extent of his wound is not known and he never made a claim of disability from the result of it. He was left sick and/or wounded in Tennessee from December 1864 to April 1865. On May 22, 1865 he was discharged in Nashville.

Jerome had a number of cousins that also served in the war. His Uncle Silas had three sons who served; Atellus and Rufus Dooley both served in the 21st Indiana Infantry; later designated as the 1st Indiana Heavy Artillery. Atellus died on July 19, 1864 at Baton Rouge; Barton W. Dooley served in the 115th Indiana Regiment.

On April 4, 1869 he married Martha Jane Oldshue and they would have nine children. His father-in-law, Jacob Oldshue served as Quarter Master Sergeant of the 5th Indiana Volunteers during the Mexican War.

After the war and for the rest of his life Jerome suffered from stomach ailments. For a time, in his later years, he worked as a mail carrier. One thing that he never forgets is his time in the Army. Jerome shows up in the regiments post war books as attending most of the 40th Indiana reunion meetings. His Civil War service had truly left an impact on the rest of his life. Jerome B. Dooley died on April 29, 1929 in Terre Haute, Indiana and is buried in Highland Lawn Cemetery.

Terre Haute Trinune, Wednesday, 10 April 1929

Obituary of Jerome B. Dooley: Jerome B. Dooley, 85 years old, died at the residence of his granddaughter Mrs. Allen Savage, 1440 Woodley Avenue, Tuesday afternoon at 12:45 o’clock. He is survived by four daughters, Mrs. William Grieve, Mrs. Clifford C. Wheeler, and Mrs. George J. Ensminger, all of Terre Haute, and Mrs. Maude Clark of Detroit; one son Marcus A. Dooley, of Terre Haute, and 14 grandchildren and 14 great grand-children. Mr Dooley was a Civil War veteran.

A Special Thanks to one of Jeromes Great Grandson’s, Matthew Rector,  for the great images and biography help.

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2 Responses to “Pvt. Jerome B. Dooley”

  1. Scott Warbritton Says:

    It is really fantastic to see a picture of my great-great grandfather, and to hear about his service in thje Civil War. Thanks.

  2. Kathryn Sabetzadeh Says:

    Thank you so much for this entry. Jerome B. Dooley is my great-great grandfather, who I don’t know much about. This article is the first information I have found on him.

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